ADA compliance Tag

It has certainly been a rough year or so for many small- to medium-sized businesses. Trying to stay afloat while keeping up with constantly changing mandates and guidelines, making sure both employees and patrons feel as safe as possible, and dealing with product and labor...

What is the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)? The Americans with Disabilities Act or ADA is a civil rights law that was enacted in 1990 that prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities. It aims to ensure people living with disabilities have equal access to opportunities and services available to all, including “jobs, schools, transportation, and all public and private places that are open to the general public”. Since 2018, these “public and private places…open to the general public” have been extended to the digital sphere per section 508. Your website is an extension of your brick and mortar storefront – if not your only storefront – and is expected to make accommodations for the disabled. The law covers any business that falls under Title I or Title III of the ADA, including federal agencies, contractors, employers, and companies receiving federal funding; however, even if your business is not explicitly represented by these categories, you’re still leaving yourself vulnerable to lawsuits if your website is not ADA compliant. There are many advantages to updating your website to adhere to ADA accessibility requirements aside from avoiding legal action. Thoughtful website design with special needs in mind can help:
  • Improve your website’s search engine optimization (SEO)
  • Broaden your customer base
  • Boost your business reputation
  • Save you time and money
Read on to learn more about the top 5 reasons your website needs to be ADA compliant.
Is your website designed with your target consumer in mind? Remember, your website isn’t for you – it’s to showcase your business in a way that resonates with and is easily understood by your users.
In 2017 Governor Jerry Brown signed A.B. 434, the first law to address ADA compliance online.  It required state agencies and state entities to post a certification of compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 Level AA, or a subsequent version, on their website home pages.
Now that ADA compliance for websites is becoming a necessity, it’s important to know whether your website is indeed compliant to the law, or if you’ll need to make changes to your website to meet ADA standards. Below we’ll also show you examples of websites that are ADA compliant and then explain what can be done to ensure that your website meets those standards.   The ultimate objective of ADA compliance is a website that will be easily accessible for any and all users, including those who are visually or hearing impaired or who have other disabilities. To be able to share your website with all audiences, adjustments to your site will most likely need to be made, which will vary anywhere from the conversion of PDFs to close captioning for video. Below, we’ll cover each of those ADA compliance adjustments for you.

Non-compliance to ADA law can be a costly endeavor for a business looking to improve their digital presence. Since 2017, there has been a 177% increase in website accessibility lawsuits in Federal Court, costing businesses up to millions of dollars in fines and settlements. Websites that have not ensured their compliance to ADA law run a high risk of being sued, making it ever more important to hold ADA compliance in high regard as a website owner or operator.

Two years ago, almost exactly to the day, Governor Jerry Brown signed A.B. 434, the first law to address ADA compliance online.  A.B. 434 requires state agencies and state entities to post a certification of compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 Level AA,...